Successful Dental Implant for Marfan Syndrome Patient

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Recently published in the Journal of Oral Implantology, a new treatment option is presented for patients with Marfan syndrome who need dental prostheses.

Journal of Oral Implantology Volume 46 Issue 2 cover

Journal of Oral Implantology Volume 46 Issue 2

The clinicians also reviewed the many complications associated with Marfan syndrome. In doing so, they highlighted that dental professionals should become familiar with the oral manifestations of this syndrome to help patients improve their quality of life through prevention and management.

Journal of Oral Implantology – Marfan syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects connective tissue throughout the body and causes many clinical manifestations in patients. One such common complication is advanced gum disease that increases the risk for mitral valve prolapse and damage the aorta, bones, eyes, lungs, and covering of the spinal cord. A recent case report in the Journal of Oral Implantology details a viable treatment option for a Marfan syndrome patient with jawbone loss and misaligned teeth.

Clinicians from the University of Kentucky and the University of Aberdeen cared for a 56-year-old Marfan syndrome patient who had a long and complex oral treatment history. However, as a result of advanced gum disease, bone loss continued to progress, and the patient sought a full-mouth dental replacement. First, dentists performed a sinus lift with a bone graft to augment the upper jawbone that had lost volume and density; without it, there would not have been enough bone to support dental implants. After a healing period of 9 months, clinicians extracted all remaining teeth and examined the quality of the bone graft, noting that the outcome was positive.

Nine SLActive screw-like implants were placed in the lower and upper jaw ridges, where teeth are normally. Then, after the implants integrated with the jaw bones—called osseointegration— locator abutments were installed, which are above-the-gum attachment pieces that allow the patient to easily insert a removable dental prosthesis. Finally, the dental prosthesis was constructed, fitted and provided to the patient. The patient was seen for follow-up appointments for 2 years, and the clinicians noted that the patient was pleased with the result and had no problems with the removable dental prosthesis.

The clinicians also reviewed the many complications associated with Marfan syndrome. In doing so, they highlighted that dental professionals should become familiar with the oral manifestations of this syndrome to help patients improve their quality of life through prevention and management. The authors conclude that their technique is an excellent option for patients with Marfan syndrome who need a dental prostheses.

Full text of the article “Full-Mouth Rehabilitation with Implant-Prosthesis in Marfan Syndrome Patient: Clinical Report and Literature Review” in the Journal of Oral Implantology is available at https://doi.org/10.1563/aaid-joi-D-19-00151.

About the Journal of Oral Implantology

The Journal of Oral Implantology is the official publication of the American Academy of Implant Dentistry and the American Academy of Implant Prosthodontics. It is dedicated to providing valuable information to general dentists, oral surgeons, prosthodontists, periodontists, scientists, clinicians, laboratory owners and technicians, manufacturers, and educators. The JOI distinguishes itself as the first and oldest journal in the world devoted exclusively to implant dentistry. For more information about the journal or the society, please visit http://www.joionline.org

Media Contact:
Dominique Scanlan
Allen Press, Inc.
800/627-0326 ext. 226
dscanlan@allenpress.com

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Dominique Scanlan
Allen Press
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