Technology Used in COVID Vaccine Can Also Help With Hair Loss

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California Hair Surgeon Leading Way in State-of-the-Art Hair Restoration Therapy

A key piece of technology used to create the Pfizer and Moderna COVID vaccines is also found in a hi-tech injection therapy to battle hair loss for men and women. World-renowned hair restoration surgeon, Dr. Sara Wasserbauer, has incorporated exosome hair loss therapy into her armamentarium of treatments for her patients. Exosome injection therapy is a relatively non-invasive, in-office treatment that has shown early promise to slow down hair loss and, possibly even promote impressive new hair growth within just a few months.

“Exosome hair therapy is a promising new therapy option for many hair loss patients who have either tried about other every kind of treatment or who are looking for a non-pharmaceutical or non-surgical solution for their hair loss,” explains Dr. Wasserbauer, a Diplomate of the American Board of Hair Restoration Surgery and Fellow of the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery. “This is a simple and safe injection therapy utilizing exosomes that carry the same messenger RNA used in the COVID vaccine with one major difference; instead of being used to fight a potentially deadly virus, the mRNA is used to stimulate new hair growth.”

WHAT ARE EXOSOMES?

  • Tiny nanoparticles discovered by scientists 35 five years ago
  • Do not contain DNA
  • Used for intercellular signaling
  • Contain messenger RNA (mRNA) and microRNA (miRNA) that execute cell-to-cell communication

Exosomes contain various growth factors. They are collected from stem cells in a process that is FDA registered and inspected. “It is important to note, exosome therapy is not stem cell therapy, and there is no approved 'stem cell therapy' for hair loss,” explains Dr. Wasserbauer. “Exosomes are extracellular vesicles, like tiny balloons, that are released from stem cells. The vesicles trigger signaling pathways for growth and healing, like for repairing a broken bone or promoting hair growth.”

A recent study by researchers at North Carolina State University supports how these kinds of messenger cells could trigger hair regeneration. The scientists found hair follicles do not disappear when someone starts balding. Instead, the follicles shrink or atrophy and become inactive. If the cells around the hair follicles could be replenished, those smaller follicles might recover and grow thicker hair shafts.

The exosome hair therapy process is so simple that Dr. Wasserbauer and her team can do the treatment in one of her exam rooms in her office. The doctor injects the exosomes into the fatty layer of the scalp that surrounds hair to stimulate the cells around hair follicles. “In some cases, we even add microdermabrasion to create small micro wounds to help stimulate the exosomes,” says Dr. Wasserbauer. “This treatment and other injection therapies utilizing PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) have shown impressively quick hair growth in some cases (click for example), and in many other cases, the growth continues for up to a year or more.”

Dr. Wasserbauer consults patients at multiple locations in Northern California. In addition to exosome hair therapy, she conducts a variety of other hair restoration procedures, including follicular unit hair transplantation (FUT or FUE), eyebrow and eyelash hair transplantation, scalp micro-pigmentation and low level light therapy. She is available for phone and virtual interviews to discuss any or all treatments.

About Dr. Wasserbauer, M.D., A.B.H.R.S., F.I.S.H.R.S.

Dr. Sara Wasserbauer is one of our nation’s leading hair restoration experts. In addition to her practice at three San Francisco offices, she currently serves as immediate Past-President of the Board of Directors for the American Board of Hair Restoration Surgeons. She also writes a monthly feature article for the ISHRS Hair Transplant Forum International and is a frequent media source on hair loss and related treatments. For more information, visit http://www.californiahairsurgeon.com

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Nancy Bostrom
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