THRIVING IN QUARANTINE — Really? It’s Happening

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As America begins yet another difficult week of lockdown, many are struggling on a daily basis to find inspiration and motivation. But there is one group that is coping surprisingly well, even thriving, in quarantine, according to a proprietary survey or more than 2,000 readers of ADDitudemag.com.

It's absolutely fascinating the way the unique wiring of the ADHD brain causes it to be drawn to new experiences, as well as creative ideas and approaches neurotypical individuals often cannot see," said board certified psychiatrist, William Dodson, MD, a member of ADDitude's medical review board.

THRIVING IN QUARANTINE — Really? It’s Happening

As America begins yet another difficult week of lockdown, many are struggling on a daily basis to find inspiration and motivation. But there is one group that is coping surprisingly well, even thriving, in quarantine.

“When we think attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, many of us think of characteristics like distractibility, and disorganization,” says Susan Caughman, publisher and editor-in-chief of ADDitude magazine, and its partner website additudemag.com, “but the reality is that, during a time of crisis, many people with ADHD exhibit the exact opposite qualities. Their brains kick into a higher gear, they become hyper-focused, and decisive, and are able to offer clarity, at a time when other others appear flustered and confused.”

A recent survey of more than 2,000 ADDitude readers confirmed that 40% of adults with a diagnosis felt their ADHD gave them an emotional advantage during this unprecedented national public health crisis.

Survey Excerpts:

“I love that we have to come up with new ways to do things… because change doesn’t bother me, I adapt. Honestly, it seems that the world is now more suited to me and I don’t have to work so hard to fit in, or cope.”

Another reader says her ability to hyper-focus is helping her absorb and retain information about the virus, the immune system, and epidemiology overall… “Some folks might find that daunting, but for me, connecting all these dots gives me greater understanding about our situation, and that keeps me more grounded and calmer.”

And another reported, “The world is moving slow right now, and for once, I am allowed to just be me…. My distractibility used to take up so much time, but now we’re in limbo and time doesn’t exist. I get to relax while I am in a hyper-focused creative state… it feels glorious some days – I feel free.”

“It’s absolutely fascinating the way the unique wiring of the ADHD brain causes it to be drawn to new experiences, as well as creative ideas and approaches that neurotypical individuals often cannot see,” commented board certified psychiatrist, William Dodson, M.D., a member of ADDitude’s medical review board. “That’s why we believe many people despite the challenging circumstances brought on by social distancing and quarantine, are doing so well in these unprecedented times.”

For more information on ADDitude’s proprietary survey, as well as possible interviews with patients, medical review board members, and/or publisher Susan Caughman, please contact Ann Gault at (973) 865 2261 or ann.gault@newhopemedia.com

Contact:
Ann Gault
Phone: (973) 865-2261
Email: ann.gault@newhopemedia.com

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